Water Treatment Technologies – Present and Future

16:00 18-11-2012


Building 8, Floor 4, Auditorium 400

The Faculty of Technological Management at HIT is proud to host, within the framework of a unique study day on the topic: "Water Treatment Technologies in the Present and in the Future,", Dr. Sinaia Netanyahu, the Head Scientist at the Israel Ministry of Environmental Protection; Mr. Oren Blonder, Products Marketing Manager at the White Water Technologies Company and Mr. Abraham Tene, Head of the Desalination Division of the Israel Water Authority and Chairman of the WDA – Israel Desalination Administration.

Due to the limited number of places, participation is contingent on early registration.

Event Program:
 

 16:00

Greetings and Introductory Words


Preparation for climatic changes in Israel and worldwide and the potential for the promotion of Israeli technologies and knowledge in the field of hydrology.
Dr. Sinaia Netanyahu, Head Scientist, Israel Ministry of Environmental Protection
 


Water – The Evolution of Quality Monitoring
Mr. Oren Blonder, Products Marketing Manager, White Water Technologies Company
 

Water – Supply Management and Desalination in Israel
Mr. Abraham Tene, Head of the Desalination Wing at the Israel Water Authority and Chairman of the WDA – Israel Desalination Administration.
 

Moderation: Dr. Eyal Brill, Faculty of Technological Management, HIT.
 

Lecture Summaries

Preparation for climatic changes in Israel and worldwide and the potential for the promotion of Israeli technologies and knowledge in the field of hydrology.
Dr. Sinaia Netanyahu, Head Scientist, Israel Ministry of Environmental Protection

Climate changes, some of which are attributed to natural processes and some to anthropogenic activity, have an impact on almost every sphere of our lives: the accessibility level of water sources; the degree of stability of ecological systems; the vulnerability of biodiversity; food production capacity; energy production and consumption; the planning of cities and residential buildings; motivation to immigrate; economic burdens on the general economy and more.
Many countries are preparing for climatic changes. However, the level of such readiness is often determined by the degree of exposure, uncertainty and risks. It is customary to divide this preparation into three main areas: an evaluation of the local scope and impact of the climatic change; the reduction of greenhouse-gas emissions; and actual adjustment to climatic change. Existing knowledge indicates that the simple reduction of greenhouse-gas emissions falls short of stopping climatic changes and, therefore, it is necessary to determine several steps of adjustment to the effects of climatic changes.

Climatic changes are usually manifested in extreme, localized events, but there are also indications of changes in the characteristics of climatic trends. Thus, adjustment to climatic change requires not only organization for extreme events, but also general preparation for incremental changes.

There are different approaches toward the adjustment to climatic change. The Inter-governmental Panel on Climatic Change, currently working on its fifth evaluation paper, distinguishes six different approaches to the adjustment and preparation for extreme climatic situations. These approaches often overlap and supplement each other, and include: exposure reduction; transfer and distribution of risks; preparation, reaction and rehabilitation; impact reduction; transformation; and increasing fortitude against changing risks.

Regarding preparations in the field of hydrology, the emerging need is for a wide spectrum of solutions-- starting with alteration of managerial paradigms for the dynamic spatial planning of all natural water sources (runoff and ground-waters), through technological solutions, and to the development of general incentives. Not all these solutions necessitate huge capital investments, but many do require transformed thinking in the fields of engineering, environment, economics and social sciences. The main manifestation of this change is in the developing countries, characterized by the high level of exposure and vulnerability to climatic change. An international effort is being made today, under the auspices of the UNFCCC, to assist the developing countries in preparing for climatic change, mainly in regard to food and water, which provides a useful platform for the commercial sector. This is a huge opportunity for Israeli knowhow in the planning and implementation of water technologies to be expressed commercially by the provision of solutions to countries working to develop adjustment steps for climatic change.
About the lecturer:
Dr. Sinaia Netanyahu holds a Ph.D. degree from the College Park University, Maryland, US, in the field of Natural Resource Economics.
Served for several years in a senior management post in TAHAL ("Water Planning for Israel, Ltd.").
Currently serves as the Head Scientist of the Israel Ministry of Environmental Protection
Email: netanyahu-s@sviva.gov.il.

 


 

Water – The Evolution of Quality Monitoring
Mr. Oren Blonder, Products Marketing Manager at
 
White Water Technologies Company
Since the invention of different measurement methods for assessing water quality by means of chemical parameters (reaction, murkiness, electric conductivity, etc.), these methods became entrenched in the thinking of water-quality engineers around the world.
The problem with these methods is that none of them really measures water quality, but rather the indirect parameters from which we can deduce (if not 'guess') the quality of our drinking water.

Recently, several sensing technologies have been developed that directly monitor the quality of the water, instead of conveniently measuring only individual parameters, which are easy to quantify.

A higher stage in the evolution of monitoring consists of computer programs input with data from indirect measurement parameters ("first generation parameters"), which are analyzed using sophisticated algorithms and powerful statistical tools to create a true and updated picture of the water quality.

The world of water, being essentially a slow adaptor, gradually absorbs these new technologies, but is still greatly cobbled by old measurement techniques. The most efficient way to facilitate this natural process is through regulation, instruction and explanation.

About the lecturer:
Mr. Oren Blonder, Products Marketing Manager at the White Water Technologies Company, has an M. Sc. in Soil and Water Sciences from the Hebrew University of Jerusalem.
Served for 6 years as the Director of the Agriculture, Water and Environment Department at the Peres Center for Peace and as the Project Manager of that department.
Email: orenb@w-water.com.


Water–Supply Management and Desalination in Israel
Mr. Abraham Tene, Head of the Desalination
 
Division of the Israel Water Authority and Chairman of the WDA – Israel Desalination Administration
The transition to seawater desalination in huge facilities in Israel began to develop after Government decisions from 2000 on. This lecture deals with Israel's desalination policy and its implementation over the next decade and considering the following generations.

Currently, Israel desalinates approximately 300 mcmy (million cubic meters per year) and, by the end of 2012, we expect to reach 420 mcmys, with the expected goal of 585 or more mcmys of seawater desalination by the end of 2013.
This lecture will present the objectives set by the Israel Water Authority and how to reach them with the aid of desalination.
Government decisions concerning the scope of desalination will be presented.
The expected supply and demand data for the coming decade will be presented and how the desalination program is derived from them.
The leading desalination technologies will be described and elaborated regarding the reverse-osmosis technology used in Israel and how this affects water quality and desalination prices.

The contractual arrangements between the State of Israel and the desalination companies will be described and the leading companies in this field in Israel will be presented.
The various obstacles blocking the promotion of desalination will be described.
An extensive survey of the current desalination layout will be provided and the existing and planned desalination plants will be described.
About the lecturer:
Mr. Abraham Tene is a Chemical Engineer, a graduate of the Technion/Ben-Gurion University of the Negev in 1972. Served as a Senior Project Manager and manages planning companies dealing with industry, water and sewage.
Employed by the Israel Water Authority since 2005.
Current position: Head of the Desalination Division at the Israel Water Authority and Chairman of the WDA – Israel Desalination Administration.
Member of the Directorate of the Israel Water Union.
Member of the Directorate of the Israel Desalination Union.
Email: Abrahamt@water.gov.il.